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Do you know what your rights are and what you are allowed and aren't allowed to do at your age? On this site, you'll find out about your rights in various areas of your life.

It's not easy being young and getting people to take you seriously.

This site shows you what your rights are, what you are entitled to and how you should be treated. It also has a section about at what age you are legally allowed to do things.

On this website, you will find information on the following issues:

  • Your rights
  • At what age can I?
  • Legal advice
  • Contact details of the Centre for Child Law

The Centre established a Children’s Litigation Project in August 2003 (with a grant from the Open Society Foundation) in order to undertake impact litigation work in the children’s rights sector. Advocate Ann Skelton is the project co-ordinator, and the project is currently dealing with a number of cases.

You've got to learn to stand up for yourself and make sure you are treated fairly. So why not start now?

  • Protection from Abuse
  • Breaking the law
  • Know Your Rights

If you don't find the answers to your questions here, feel free to contact the Centre for Child Law.

Your details will not be shared with anyone outside of the Centre, unless we feel you are in danger or need urgent help. In that case, we will contact you first.

 

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Latest News

 21 September 2018

Press Release - Centre for Child Law & SECTION27 concerned about the public discourse on violence in schools

The Centre for Child law and SECTION27 are concerned by recent reports of incidents of teachers being assaulted by learners. We understand the concerns arising out of these revelations of violence against teachers. However, we are apprehensive about the public sentiments expressed on this issue. In particular we are worried about the sentiments indicating the need for more punitive measures to be put in place to deal with the learners. The manner in which the discourse is developing, for instance the call to bring the SAPS into schools, is alarming.

We do not agree with the involvement of police in schools or believe that corporal punishment or any heavy handedness is the answer to the problem of violence in these cases. We are of the view that schools are a microcosm of communities, therefore responses must start both at schools and at home. 

We are of the view that preventing violence has to be a priority for everyone in South Africa. Furthermore, we would like to underscore the need for a holistic approach to resolving the problem. One which focuses on the individual learner and seeks to probe the underlying reasons as to why that learner is resorting to violence as an appropriate response to the situation.

For more please see the press release below:

Press Release

 

 

Centre for Child Law