International Child Law Instruments PDF Print E-mail
International law 1 cover

International law and domestic human rights litigation in Africa - Magnus Killander (editor)

Read...

The role of international law in the development of children’s rights in South Africa: A children’s rights litigator’s perspective (Chapter 10). Karabo Ngidi

 

United Nations

United Nations Convention On The Rights Of The Child
An international convention that has been ratified by almost all of the nations of the world, including South Africa
 
Committee on the Rights of the Child (United Nations website)
This Committee develops various General Comments relating to the rights of children
 
United Nations Guidelines For The Prevention Of Juvenile Delinquency
A set of international guidelines for nations to guide the prevention of children becoming involved in crime. Also known as the "Riyadh Guidelines"

United Nations Rules For The Protection Of Juveniles Deprived Of Their Liberty
A set of international rules relating to the care and treatment of all children who have been placed in facilities from which they cannot leave at will. Also known as the "JDLs"

United Nations Minimum Rules For The Administration Of Juvenile Justice
A set of international minimum rules for the administration of juvenile justice. Also known as the "Beijing Rules"
 
 

African Charter

African Charter On The Rights And Welfare Of Children
A regional charter ratified by numerous African nations, including South Africa
 
 

Search the Centre for Child Law


Latest News

18 May 2018

Centre for Child Law represented at Continental Conference on Access to Justice for Children in Africa

On 8 to 10 May 2018, the Centre's Karabo Ozah and Zita Hansungule attended the Continental Conference on
Access to Justice for Children in Africa held in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. The Conference was hosted by the African
Child Policy Forum (ACPF) and Defence for Children International (DCI).

The discussions and deliberations dealt with a number of issues related to access to justice for children including:
legal pluralism in Africa and its impact on access to justice for children; access to justice for children in the context
of armed conflict; vulnerability and access to justice for children; access to justice for children with disabilities in Africa;
and technology and children's access to justice.

A new report from ACPF was launched at the conference: "Spotlighting the invisible – Justice for Children in Africa".
The Centre's Ms Karabo Ozah reflected on the report as a child right's expert. Ms Ozah reflections on the findings of the
report; highlighted practical realities dealt with in the report; and gave recommendations on the way forward. Ms 
Hansungule reflected on the litigation and advocacy work that the Centre has engaged in to ensure access for children
with psychosocial disabilities, in particular children with behavioural difficulties. 

At the conclusion of the Conference a call to action was adopted by participants. The call to action urged various duty
bearers to make access to justice a reality for all children on the African continent. The duty bearers include: African
Governments; AU Organs and Treaty Bodies; The UN Committee on the Rights of the Child; Civil Society Organisations;
International Non-Governmental Organisations; UN Agencies; Academic Institutions; and Development and Multilateral
partners.

The Centre for Child Law aims to use the report and call for action to enhance their work in protecting and promoting
the rights of children, in particular access to justice for children, in South Africa and work towards a child-friendly justice
system.

For more read an article on the University of Pretoria, Faculty of Law website here.

 

 

 

 

Centre for Child Law