Publications (Books) PDF Print E-mail

Child Law in South Africa
Trynie Boezaart

Child Law in South Africa is the updated and greatly expanded successor to Introduction to Child Law in South Africa (2000). In recent years child law has developed into a well-defined field, both in legal practice and in research. Child Law in South Africa, with its eighteen new and seven entirely updated chapters, is intended as a source of first reference for all legal questions pertaining to children.

 

This publication is, amongst others, aimed at addressing some of the burning issues that are frequently dealt with in a multi-disciplinary way. It provides insight into the profound influence of recent legislation – e.g. the Children’s Act 38 of 2005, the Child Justice Act 75 of 2008 and the Criminal Law (Sexual Offences and Related Matters) Amendment Act 32 of 2007 – and comments on ground-breaking case law and the latest research findings in the field.

 

Written by 23 experts in the field, Child Law in South Africa reflects the enormous scope and dynamics involved in child law and is sure to encourage further debate and analysis.

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Commentary on the Children’s Act (Revision Service 2, 2010)
CJ Davel & AM Skelton

Written by the team of experts who were actively involved in drafting and commenting on the Bill, Commentary on the Children’s Act is the first section-by-section guide to the Children’s Act 38 of 2005. Every section of the Act is discussed within the context of the Act and its origin, giving practical guidance on its interpretation and application.

The Commentary is updated  up to Revision Service 2, 2010, with outstanding chapters dealt with in the Children’s Amendment Bill and forthcoming regulations.

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Justice for child victims and witnesses of crime
Edited by the Centre for Child Law

Child victims and witnesses of crime are amongst the most vulnerable people in the justice system. The United Nations issued guidelines for their protection in 2005. This publication sets out the guidelines in the South African context.

Does South African law reflect these guidelines? What are the challenges to be faced in order to bring South African law and practice in line with these international standards? Answers to these questions are provided in this up-to-date analysis of the current state of the law.

This publication is a useful guide for students of law, as well as for practitioners who work with children in the courts. Launched during the internationally recognised “16 days of activism to end violence against women and children”, the publication is designed to be of assistance in the everyday working life of presiding officers, prosecutors, defence lawyers, social workers, intermediaries and other professionals.

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Read more about this publication on the Pretoria University Law Press (PULP) website

 

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Latest News

23 October 2017

Court outlaws "reasonable chastisement" defence to corporal punishment of children in the home

"Parents should think twice about lifting their hands to their children; those who hit children will no longer be able to plead special defence in court if criminally charged. 

The Gauteng High Court, Joburg, ruled on Thursday that the defence of reasonable chastisement was not in line with the constitution and no longer applied in law. 

The judgment did not create a new offence, as hitting a child, whether your own or someone else's, has always been assault under the country’s criminal law." - Zelda Venter

Read more of Zelda Venter's article here .

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Zita and Ann from CCL outside court on the day the judgment was handed down. CCL represented three of the parties in the matter. Download the judgment here .

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Prohib of corporal punishment in Africa

Read stats on corporal punishment in Africa here .

 

Centre for Child Law