Centre for Child Law PDF Print E-mail

The Centre for Child Law  was established in 1998 and is based in the Faculty of Law at the University of Pretoria. The Director of the Centre is Prof Ann Skelton.

The Centre contributes towards the establishment and promotion of the best interests of children in South Africa through litigation, advocacy, research and education.

The Centre is registered as a Law Clinic and through strategic impact litigation aims to set legal precedent to improve and strengthen laws pertaining to children.

University of Pretoria Faculty of Law

 

Latest Judgments & Reports

27 June 2018

 Naki & Others v Director-General: Department of Home Affairs. Ensuring access to birth registration for all children  
Read the judgment here 

 

 

6 February 2018 

NS & Others v Presiding Officer of the Children's Court. Children's Court jurisdiction to hear adoption matters 
Read the judgment here

 

Upcoming Cases and Events

          

 

 

 
 


Search the Centre for Child Law


Latest News

10 July 2018

Press Statement: Centre for Child Law responds to the article on IOL titled "Abused, Orphaned Children go Hungry after R7M 'disappears'" dated 8 July 2018

The Centre is gravely concerned about the conditions reported on in the IOL article dated 8 July 2018 regarding the treatment of the children housed at Father Smangaliso Mkhatshwa Child and Youth Care Centre (CYCC).

This is not the first CYCC to have sub-standard care, the Centre has in the past intervened on behalf of children who were in CYCCs with similar or worse problems and it is disheartening to see children who are already traumatised by the situations that led to them being removed from their parental or family environment, being failed by those tasked to protect them.

For more see the press statement:

Press Statement

 

9 July 2018

Press Statement: Child Marriage

The Centre notes with concern the report from the Commission for Gender Equality ("CGE") given at Parliament on Wednesday, stating that approximately 91 000 children of school-going-age are married.

The Centre is extremely concerned about the increasing incidence of child marriage in the country and the impact that this has on children and children's rights. Child marriage denies the rights of children and subjects them to a multitude of abuses.

The married child is often prevented from returning to school due to the commonly held view that schooling interferes with the child's duty as a "wife". Further, child marriage is likely to cause life-long trauma to children; particularly as children are removed from their family and peers and as stated by the CGE, required to "perform a wife's duties".

For more see the press statement:

Press Statement

Centre for Child Law